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Blog Posts: Haze

  • Indonesian Fires Create “Hazardous” Levels of Air Pollution in Singapore

    Silakan membaca post ini di Bahasa Indonesia.

    Fires in Indonesia continue to cause smog and haze across the region, with air pollutants reaching hazardous levels overnight in Singapore. As of 5am on September 25th, the country’s pollutant levels were the highest measured to date in 2015. At these levels, the entire population is likely to be adversely affected, and officials have already closed all primary and secondary schools until the situation improves.

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  • Preventing Forest Fires in Indonesia: Focus on Riau Province, Peatland, and Illegal Burning

    Stopping recurring fires and protecting Indonesia’s communities, businesses, and forests requires a proactive plan to prevent future fires, or at least greatly reduce their intensity.

    As part of our ongoing Indonesia forest fires series, WRI’s researchers have used data from the Global Forest Watch platform along with preliminary on-the-ground research to analyze Indonesia’s forest fires and haze problem.

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  • Fires in Indonesia Spike to Highest Levels Since June 2013 Haze Emergency

    In Indonesia, dramatic satellite images of heavy smoke plumes show the large amount of pollutants being discharged to the atmosphere. The fires are extensive in areas with deep peat soils, suggesting high volumes of carbon are being released, contributing to climate change.

    Global Forest Watch shows that some of the largest fires are on fully developed plantations, despite the fact that many of these companies are committed to eliminating fire in their management practices. The persistence of the fires—and the intensity with which they have returned—raises important questions.

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  • Indonesian Fires Bring More Haze to Southeast Asia

    Clearing land for timber and agriculture is likely to blame. According to data from Global Forest Watch—a new online system that tracks tree cover change, fires, and other information in near-real time—roughly half of these fires are burning on land managed by oil palm, timber, and logging companies—despite the fact that using fire to clear land is illegal in Indonesia.

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