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Blog Posts: REDD

  • Cultivating Accountability in REDD+

    As the struggle continues to protect forests around the world, REDD+ implementers should look to cultivate and strengthen institutions and mechanisms of accountability.

    Though REDD+ includes an international accountability mechanism, case studies in Brazil and Indonesia, where civil society participated in and challenged land-use decisions, demonstrate that this will probably be insufficient for achieving REDD+ goals.

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  • 4 Reasons Assessing Governance Matters for Forests and People

    The world’s forests and the people who depend on them face a host of challenges—including deforestation, rural poverty, and degradation of critical ecosystem services. These negative outcomes are often exacerbated by weak forest governance, including low levels of transparency and participation in forest decision-making and as well as poor oversight of forest activities. To tackle these issues, decision-makers need better information about the institutional, political, and social factors that drive governance failures.

    An updated tool from WRI’s Governance of Forests Initiative aims to help policy-makers, civil society organizations, and other forest stakeholders evaluate governance of their countries’ forests. Assessing Forest Governance: The Governance of Forests Initiative Indicator Framework updates the original GFI indicators, which were published in 2009 and piloted by WRI’s civil society partners in Brazil, Cameroon, and Indonesia. Using the indicators, stakeholders can identify strengths and weaknesses in forest governance and develop reforms that benefit both people and planet.

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  • Forests and REDD+ in COP17 Durban

    With all its complex processes and acronyms, it’s easy to forget that the international climate change negotiations are supposed to lead to changes on the ground. There have been several developments this year, however, which should remind us of the urgency of the task and the importance of getting each piece of the puzzle right, including incentives for developing countries to reduce their emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+).

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  • Having Your Food and Forests, Too

    Expanding agriculture onto already degraded lands could relieve pressure on the world’s remaining forests.

    Enabling tropical countries to boost their economies and feed global populations while conserving forests and combating climate change is a developmental and environmental nut that has yet to be cracked. On Thursday, The Prince of Wales will gather international leaders from governments, environmental and social NGOs, agribusiness and finance sectors to highlight ways in which agricultural production can expand without causing further deforestation. One of them is revolutionary in its practicality - restoring degraded lands to absorb agricultural expansion.

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  • What’s Next for Indonesia-Norway Cooperation on Forests?

    In May 2010, Norway agreed to contribute up to $1 billion towards reducing deforestation and forest degradation and loss of peatland in Indonesia, which now account for more than 80 percent of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions. The “Letter of Intent” is a promising first step, yet the two countries must still settle key details of the agreement. Below is WRI’s analysis of the Letter of Intent and recommendations for what should be addressed next.

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